Photo 1. Decolonizing conservation research methods

1. Decolonizing conservation research methods

Photo 12. Species distribution modelling while accounting for imperfect detection – in R

12. Species distribution modelling while accounting for imperfect detection – in R

Photo 3. Interplays of science, policy and society for planetary wellbeing: meaningful scie

3. Interplays of science, policy and society for planetary wellbeing: meaningful scie

Photo 7. Spatial conservation planning with Zonation

7. Spatial conservation planning with Zonation

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1. Decolonizing conservation research methods  

Goal: The aim of this short course is to raise awareness of the challenges and complexities in doing conservation research with and/or amongst Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs). We will uncover the colonial legacy of many top-down research methods and give a number of practical guidelines and tools to promote ethical engagement with IPLCs in the context of conservation research. The aim of this short course is to raise awareness of the challenges and complexities in doing conservation research with and/or amongst Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs). We will uncover the colonial legacy of many top-down research methods and give a number of practical guidelines and tools to promote ethical engagement with IPLCs in the context of conservation research.
Duration: 0.5 day; 10th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

2. Getting the Most out of the Media

Goals: By the end of the course, delegates will know how to use the media more effectively, get their own message across, and feel confident about doing press or broadcast interviews and podcasts.
Duration: 0.5 day; 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

3. Interplays of science, policy and society for planetary wellbeing: meaningful science communication and outreach on European scale

Goal: The objective of this course is to find effective and innovative ways to communicate scientific research as a part of science-policy-society interaction. The course aims to find new ways to approach different types of audiences ranging from the general public and civil society to policy makers through engagement and knowledge co-production. The idea will be to discover diverse tools and approaches for outreach and public engagement that make a difference. This course adds to the symposium “Informed decision-making for planetary wellbeing” held in ECCB2018.
Duration: 0.5-1 day (depending on the number of participants); 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 

 

 
4. A crash-course in citizen science

Goal: The aim of this course is to uncover the phases of designing and implementing a citizen science project, with particular attention to target groups, data quality and communication.
Duration: 1 day; 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

5. Dr Kronholm’s best R tips and tricks

Goal: Is R causing you anxiety? R Never seems to load your data, and this makes you sad? The goal of this course is to learn to avoid common pitfalls and learn to love R!
Duration: 1 day; 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 

 
6. Ethics and Conservation? An introduction to the use of the Ethical Review process

Goal: The goal of the course proposal is to train participants in ethical reasoning and let them become familiar with some ethical tools and methodologies that can be employed in conservation issues.
Duration: 1 day; 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

7. Spatial conservation planning with Zonation

Goal: A short course to running spatial conservation prioritisation analyses
Duration: 1 day; 11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 

 

 

 

 

8. The use of computer simulations based on molecular markers data for conservation of natural forest resources

Goal: Train participants (i) to understand the genetic approach for conservation of natural forest populations; (ii) to understand the importance of genetic diversity and the genetic effects of forest destruction and fragmentation; (iii) to identify the conservation status of populations or species through the use of molecular markers data and computer simulations; and (iv) to define the most suitable for conservation based on the simulation results.
Duration: 2 days; 10-11th June 2018
Fee: None.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

9. Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC)

Goal: The goal of the course is that participants are able to apply HMSC to their own data
Duration: 2 days; 10-11th June 2018
Fee: None.

 

 

 

 
 

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

10. Principles and practice of ecosystem-based adaptive conservation management

Goal: Participants are introduced to methods of participatory and adaptive conservation management.
Duration: 2 days; 10-11th June 2018
Fee: 150€/participant. The fee covers preparation and delivery time for the course, course material and travel expenses for two trainers.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

11. An innovative new approach to define, track, and report on conservation results: Project Management for Wildlife Conservation

Goal: To provide participants with skills, conference and certification in the Project Management for Wildlife Conservation approach.
Duration: 2 days; 10-11th June 2018
Fee: 320€/ participant. The fee covers preparation and delivery time for the course, and travel expenses for two trainers. The course includes the PMWC Foundation exam worth 57€.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 

 

 

 

12. Species distribution modelling while accounting for imperfect detection – in R

Goal: The goal of the course is to teach participants how to use R to model species distributions, while accounting for the imperfect detection of those species.
Duration: 2 days; 10-11th June 2018
Fee: 200€/participant. The fee covers preparation and delivery time for the course and the instructor’s travel costs.

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 
 

 
 
 
13. Ecology and conservation of saproxylic species and dead wood habitats in Europe

Goal: An intensive course where guest teachers will present and discuss dead wood conservation issues in Europe.
Duration: 2 days; 16-17th June 2018
Fee:  200€ (includes course fee, shared accommodation, meals, coffee and snacks for two days, sauna and bus transportation from Jyväskylä to Konnevesi and back to Jyväskylä)

Click here for course organizers, description, location and additional information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Decolonizing conservation research methods

Organizers: Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, Aili Pyhälä & Mar Cabeza (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Description: Reframing the way in which conservation engages with Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) has been recurrently proposed as a top priority for global biodiversity governance and planetary well-being. Several international agreements, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) or the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), have firmly asserted the urgent need to bring new tools and approaches to actively consult, involve, and benefit IPLCs in conservation research, for reasons of social justice and more inclusive biodiversity governance.

In this short course, we will offer an overview of the growing philosophy of “decolonizing methodologies” in the context of conservation research. Stemming from anthropological and development studies research, the notion of decolonizing research methods is still rarely integrated in the curricula of conservation biologists, many of whom work in areas inhabited by IPLCs. This short course, consisting of a lecture and a series of dilemma-solving exercises, will encourage collective reflection on different ethical aspects that need to be considered when doing conservation research with and/or amongst IPLCs.

By highlighting several cases of questionable forms of top-down research, we will illustrate how colonizing conservation research can perpetuate unequal power relations and disenfranchisement of IPLCs, eventually undermining their own sense of self-worth as well as epistemic traditions. We will also offer examples of different proactive, precautionary, participatory and ethical approaches that conservation researchers can adopt to embrace IPLCs as agents of action (rather than subjects of study) and avoid the imposition of colonizing methodologies. Emphasis will be placed on different codes of ethical conduct available, and the importance of abiding to the practice of Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC), as established by the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing. The course will be of interest to early-career scholars and practitioners willing to engage with IPLCs in an ethical and participatory manner.

Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/25 participants
Specific information: 

  • 9:00-10:00h Lecture on decolonizing methodologies
  • 10:00-11:30h Knowledge café / Dilemma discussions 
  • 11:30-12:30h Supervised writing exercise / Rethink your own current or future research or work in the light of decolonizing principles
2. Getting the Most out of the Media

Organizer: Linda Fairbother (UK)
Description: Conservation issues tend to be controversial, especially when there is a real or perceived conflict between environmental preservation or restoration, and human needs such as economic development, housing, fuel, hunting, etc. Dealing well with the media is an important skill for conservationists, whether to bring attention to a campaign or project in order to gain support, or to cope with attacks, doubters and opponents.  It’s especially important to win hearts and minds of local people, or at the very least be able to explain the scientific and environmental issues in a clear and honest way through media outlets. With the growth of on-line social media, such as blogs, vlogs and podcasts, there are also new ways to reach the public, especially young people. The course will have many examples of good and bad interviews, and fun exercises to illustrate the learning points, which will also be useful in preparing for real interviews.  Delegates will be expected to take an active part.
This entertaining and practical workshop will look at 

  • how to write a good press release 
  • how to decide on the most effective message: being true and memorable
  • preparing for a media interview: focus, clarity, impact
  • staying cool and in control under pressure
  • performing well on radio and television: professional tips for interviews, podcasts, and other social media
  • continuing to improve skills after the workshop

Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 30/50 participants
Specific information: Linda Fairbother- Journalist and broadcaster for over 30 years, for BBC and ITV news reporting, BBC World Service, BBC local radio, “The Times” newspaper, etc; Media trainer associate for University of Cambridge, including an annual session for the M Phil in Conservation Leadership for the Department of Geography.

3. Interplays of science, policy and society for planetary wellbeing: meaningful science communication and outreach on European scale

Organizers: EKLIPSE project, Riikka Paloniemi (Finnish Environment Institute, Finland) & Eszter Kelemen (Environmental Social Science Research Group, Hungary)
Description: To create meaningful interplays between science, society and policy different means and channels of communication and outreach need to be explored. This holds especially true for the environmental sector where for the often global nature of issues the range of stakeholders is wide and thus requires diverse approaches. It is not merely a matter of successfully communicating scientific knowledge but also hearing, integrating and disseminating the voices of other knowledge holders.
Europe has a broad and diverse landscape of knowledge holders across academia and other domains, working at multiple levels, from the local, sub-national and national level, where most biodiversity relevant decisions are taken, to the European level, where major framework decisions like the Nature Directives or the Common Agriculture Policy are formulated. It is widely acknowledged that issues regarding biodiversity and ecosystem services are complex and often depend on a multitude of drivers, pressures and societal responses, requiring a broad array of knowledge from different stakeholders to understand and address them. Discovering diverse ways of expressing, framing and communicating topics has the ability to make these complex issues more transparent and understandable for a wider public thus promoting participation in the discussions and strengthening the legitimacy of them. Not only the “how”, but also the “when” and “where” of communicating research is important when the stakeholders vary. From traditional written and face-to-face approaches to a multitude of virtual means of dissemination the tools for scientific communication are growing, but finding the appropriate ones also becomes more challenging. 
This course aims to cover a variety of elements related to the science-policy-society communication of biodiversity and ecosystem issues (in the EU) drawing on practical experiences, hoping to build the capacity of researchers for meaningful outreach and give them novel ideas on the topic.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 15/50 participants
Specific information: 

  1. Introduction to the capacity building event (Eszter Kelemen)
  2. Key note speech: Science-policy-society communication
  3. Presentations on previous experiences of science-policy-society interplays/interfaces
  4. Training introduction
  5. Training exercise workshop in four small groups, led by a science communications agency/expert
  6. Gathering 10 main points based on the exercises and discussion of the day
  7. Concluding the session
4. A crash-course in citizen science

Organizers: Tomas Roslin (SLU, Sweden) & Mar Cabeza (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Description: As ecologists, we are always asking questions on patterns and processes much larger than we can grasp on our own. At the same time, the world is full of potential collaborators, including layman. Through approaches variously referred to as citizen science we can thus achieve so much more. And by involving wide audiences in generating scientific information, we make the dissemination of results an integral part of the process rather than a challenging chore at the end of the project. This short course will introduce the participants to the basic ideas behind citizen science. It will assist participants in designing citizen science protocols that are useful not only for research but also for the citizens involved. It will prompt participants to think carefully about the target groups and about data quality concerns, and it will revise common mistakes to be avoided.
The course will include lectures, group exercises, and an open discussion with cases from the participants
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/20 participants
Specific information: 

  • 9:00-11:00h Lectures
  • 11:00-12:30h Group exercises
  • 12:30-13:30h Lunch
  • 13:30-14:30h Group exercise outcomes / coffee
  • 14:30-15:30h Lecture
  • 15:30-16:30h Discussion
5. Dr Kronholm’s best R tips and tricks

Organizer: Ilkka Kronholm (University of Jyväskylä, Finland)
Description: The course is aimed for beginners who have just started using R to analyze their data but are experiencing some frustration. We will go over some common problems; such as loading your data into R, data structures, avoiding common mistakes, and some of the best tips and tricks with the help of useful packages like “plyr” and “ggplot2” for handling your data and plotting. The course contains both lectures and hands on exercises with R.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/15 participants
Specific information: Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop but there are also available computers.

6. Ethics and Conservation? An introduction to the use of the Ethical Review process

Organizers: Barbara de Mori & Linda Ferrante (University of Padua, Italy)
Description: The course proposal underlines the importance of implementing the ethics expertise of who is involved in conservation projects and efforts on an everyday basis. The establishment of an Ethical Review Process (ERP) regarding in situ and ex situ conservation projects is of paramount importance today to ensure that all the concerns and stakeholders are considered and addressed, and that decisions are made on the basis of a rational decision-making process. The immediate results of the efforts in implementing the ERP are consistency and transparency in communication with institutions and the public.
A half day devoted to training into ethical reasoning and a half day to learn how to use tools and methodologies. Teaching methodologies include enquiry based learning and participative interaction, with group discussion and a bottom-up approach to case studies. During the course, participants learn how to include ethical reasoning and ethical tools into conservation projects and their evaluation.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/20 participants

7. Spatial conservation planning with Zonation

Organizers: Heini Kujala (University of Melbourne, Australia), Tuuli Toivonen (University of Helsinki, Finland), Enrico di Minin (University of Helsinki, Finland) & Peter Kullberg(University of Helsinki, Finland)
Description: In conservation planning, an important step is to identify priority locations for cost-effective conservation actions. This includes comparing candidate sites based on different data types, including species distribution maps, habitat types, costs and threats. In practice, conservation planning often also involves reconciling conflicting land use needs, providing options for sustainable development, while safeguarding biodiversity.  
Zonation is a commonly used software in spatial prioritisation analyses. It uses information on the distribution of species, ecosystem services and habitats, as well as habitat conditions, connectivity requirements and costs to rank candidate locations based on their conservation benefit. It can incorporate various data types and considerations commonly encountered in spatial planning, such as accounting for future or ongoing threats or for uncertainties in the data. The outputs of Zonation be further analyzed using GIS or statistical software. The tool is currently being used to support decision making in land allocation for conservation and alternative land uses in a number of countries, including Finland, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and Uruguay. 
This introduction course will teach participants how to run spatial prioritisation analyses with Zonation. The learning objective of the short course is to understand the basics of the Zonation workflow from pre-processing of the spatial data to the actual prioritisation, and finally to the interpretation of the results. We demonstrate the workflow by using real-world planning and prioritisation case studies from different parts of the world. No previous knowledge of using Zonation is required, although basic understanding of spatial data, GIS and the concepts of conservation planning will be helpful.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/30 participants

8. The use of computer simulations based on molecular markers data for conservation of natural forest resources

Organizers: Caetano Miguel Lemos Serrote (Lúrio University, Mozambique)
Description: This is a training course about using data from molecular markers in simulations to study the parameters for conservation of natural forest resources. Genetic approach for conservation of natural populations will be discussed using the softwares Easypop v2.0.1 (Balloux, 2001) and Fstat v2.9.3.2 (Goudet, 2002). EasyPop allows simulating genetic, ecological and reproductive patterns from a given population based on data obtained through the use of molecular markers. The output from these simulations can be analyzed by Fstat to obtain detailed information about the population’s genetic structure such as gene flow, inbreeding and genetic drift effects. The following topics will be discussed: (1) Genetic characterization of natural populations; (2) Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium; (3) Habitat destruction and fragmentation; (4) Molecular markers; (5) Genetic structure; (6) Genetic parameters for populations’ conservation; (7) Computer simulation of genetic parameters; and (8) Practical exercises.
The conservation of genetic diversity is the lowest level for ecosystem conservation and it is determinant for future evolution and the adaptability to environmental changes, thereby contributing to the conservation of the species and the ecosystem. The short course will contribute to the theme of the conference by providing an agile tool for biology conservation through the use of the conservation genetic approach and computer simulations.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 5/10 participants
Specific information: Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop but there are also available computers.

9. Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC)

Organizers: Otso Ovaskainen & Nerea Abrego (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Description: Applications of conservation biology require a profound understanding of community ecology, in particular of the processes that determine the assembly and dynamics of species assemblages at different spatiotemporal scales. To facilitate the integration between conceptual and statistical approaches in community ecology, we have developed Hierarchical Modelling of species Communities (HMSC) as a general, flexible framework for modern analysis of community data (Ovaskainen et al. 2017). HMSC belongs to the class of joint species distribution models, and it makes it possible to derive simultaneously species- and community level inference from data on species occurrences, environmental covariates, species traits, and phylogenetic relationships. HMSC applies to a wide variety of study designs, including hierarchical data, spatial data, temporal data, and spatio-temporal data. In the workshop, we give a brief general overview of the HMSC approach, after which we focus on hands-on exercises in which the participant apply HMSC either to their own data or to our example data. 
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 10/30 participants
Specific information: The participants are encouraged to bring along a laptop with R installed, as well as their own data that they would like to analyze with HMSC (see Ovaskainen et al. 2017 for applicable data types). Instructions on how to format data will be sent beforehand to registered participants. (Reference: Ovaskainen, O., Tikhonov, G., Norberg, A., Blanchet, F. G., Duan, L., Dunson, D., Roslin, T. and Abrego, N. 2017. How to make more out of community data? A conceptual framework and its implementation as models and software. Ecology Letters 20, 561-576, doi: 10.1111/ele.12757)

10. Principles and practice of ecosystem-based adaptive conservation management

Organizers: Pierre Ibisch (Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development, Germany) & Peter Hobson (Writtle University College, UK)
Description: Participants are introduced to methods of participatory and adaptive conservation management, namely the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation (http://cmp-openstandards.org/) and MARISCO (adaptive management of vulnerability and risks at conservation sites; check out www.marisco.training). Participants will learn about the origins of adaptive management being derived from ecology, based on the theory of adaptive cycles. Apart from discussing the underlying theory, the methodological steps as well as selected case studies, participants will be involved in a hands-on MARISCO exercise related to ecosystem health and human well-being in Europe. Introductory lectures, practical work and reflective discussions are intermingled. A certificate of participation is awarded. 
Targeting the maintenance of functional ecosystems that provide the significant basis for human well-being is an integral part of an ecosystem-based sustainable development: ecosystem-based, but people-centered. Our understanding of the linkages between social and ecological systems has been growing. Consequently, both conservation and development narratives have become increasingly unified. We now must conceptualize conservation and development as occurring within a single system in which social and ecological components cannot be understood in isolation. In order to achieve true sustainability, a holistic and equitable management approach for socio-ecological systems is needed to mitigate risks without negatively influencing the well- being of human subjects and ecosystems: a more radical ecosystem approach. Underlying causes of ecosystem degradation such as global climate change and ever- growing human demands that rapidly shift socioeconomic and political baselines are often unmanageable at a local scale and require a new approach to planning and action in ecosystem management. The conditions that challenge sustainable development are shaped by increasing Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity (VUCA concept). Conservation diagnostics and management must allow for reflecting this challenging framework and prepare for the unexpected.  
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 15/40 participants

11. An innovative new approach to define, track, and report on conservation results: Project Management for Wildlife Conservation

Organizers: Beth Robinson & Ali Skeats (WildTeam UK)
Description: WildTeam, a UK charity, seeks out and develops game changing solutions that improve the way conservation projects are designed and run. We then parcel them up in engaging ways, tailored especially for conservationists.
This course will give participants a thorough grounding in the Project Management for Wildlife Conservation (PMWC) approach which is based on private and public sector expertise. PMWC includes an integrated behaviour change approach to balance human resource exploitation and wildlife conservation. PMWC aims to increase impact of conservation organisations and individuals by building their capacity to design, implement, monitor, and report on their projects for both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course aims to give participants an active learning experience and is focused around a series of participatory group exercises. This approach enables participants to learn by doing and to leave the course feeling confident that they can apply the PMWC approach straight away. There are formal assessments built into the course to help reinforce new knowledge, measure participants’ gain in skills and provide participants with certification. 
Participants will learn about setting up and running conservation project by:  

  • Creating a conservation strategy that is easy to communicate, monitor, adapt and report against 
  • Applying principles that keep projects on track and make them more impactful 
  • Assigning roles to a team so that they all have clear levels of decision making 
  • Breaking down a project into manageable phases 
  • Dealing with risks, issues, and lessons learned 
  • Using standardised templates to help plan, monitor, and report on project work. 
  • Participants can expect the following benefits: 
  • Increased individual contribution to wildlife conservation, through an increased ability to support the planning, implementation, monitoring, and reporting of a project. 
  • Improved career prospect in the wildlife conservation sector, through acquiring standardised, transferable skills in project management.

Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 16/30 participants
Specific information: Each participant will need a laptop. For more information on WildTeam visit website www.wildteam.org.uk.

12. Species distribution modelling while accounting for imperfect detection – in R

Organizers: Darryl I. MacKenzie (Proteus, New Zealand)
Description: This course shall introduce participants to approaches that can be used to model species distributions while accounting for imperfect detection of those species. Methods that are appropriate for investigating both current distributions, and how distributions change over time, will be covered. Courses participants will be taught how to fit these models in R using the package RPresence through classroom examples and exercises, and how to use the models to predict species distributions in unsurveyed regions, at future points in time, and how to create species distribution maps. Approximately 1/3 of the course will be on model theory and 2/3 on examples and exercises.
Participants are expected to be have a good working knowledge of R, and be able perform tasks such as data import/export and manipulation of data frames, understand formula-based notation for defining models (e.g., when using lm() or glm()), and how to interpret the output of regression-like analyses. This course may not be appropriate for R novices.
Location: University campus
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 30/35 participants
Specific information: Participants will be required to bring their own laptop with R installed. A list of required R packages will be provided before the course.

13. Ecology and conservation of saproxylic species and dead wood habitats in Europe

Organizer: Dmitry Schigel (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Description: A compact and intensive program will be comprised by lectures, discussions, two excursions, sauna and the movie night. This is a course, not a symposium, so no presentations are expected by the participants, but you can bring your posters to decorate the lecture hall. We will go through a broad range of topics, such as biodiversity in dead wood in boreal, temperate, Mediterranean Europe, will cover the dead wood conservation and management approaches of the East and the West. We will debate the species and habitat oriented conservation with the specific focus on dead wood and saproxylic organisms. This course is a compressed, Europe and conservation oriented version of the 2015 and 2016 courses (for these earlier events, please click here).
Location: Konnevesi Research Station 
Station’s webpage: https://www.jyu.fi/bioenv/en/konnevesi
Google Maps: https://goo.gl/maps/zm1SH9G7so62
Minimum/maximum number of participants: 12/40 participants 
Prerequisites: Interest in dead wood ecology and European conservation of forests and woodland landscapes, dead wood research or conservation experience not required. It is expected that participant have ecology and conservation education, and knowledge of entomology and mycology is welcome.