Conservation Biology Special Section: Call for Papers

Challenges and solutions to human-wildlife conflicts in agricultural landscapes

Conservation Biology invites novel research papers, reviews, and essays that focus on interactions among components of human-wildlife interactions operating over broad (i.e., landscape) spatial scales. We seek contributions that employ multidimensional frameworks (e.g., sustainability development, coupled human and natural systems, ecosystem services and disservice concepts) that can be used in policy development and management assessments. Contributions that combine participatory socioeconomic methods with ecological research or studies that address transboundary management challenges are strongly encouraged. The primary message of papers must be broadly relevant and transcend local ecosystems, species, and situations. It is crucial that contributions highlight the wider theoretical or practical implications of the work and that transferability be central to the discussion.

As human populations and activities expand and interactions with wildlife increase, more animals are being considered nuisances, particularly in agricultural landscapes. Conservationists often argue that the dramatic losses of habitat and biodiversity threaten the survival of many species; in contrast, land users who directly experience economic losses due to wildlife damages argue that losses should be compensated, prevention measures subsidized, and wildlife managed appropriately. However, there is a lack of understanding of the effects of highly dynamic changes in human-wildlife systems, which have , for example, resulted from growing demands for natural resources and agricultural products and trade-offs between conservation and production objectives. Evidence-based decisions are being called for to help the design and implementation of sustainable strategies that promote human-wildlife coexistence.

If you with to submit a paper, contact Hannes J. König for additional advice and author instructions and guidelines. The deadline for submission is 31 December 2018.

Guest Editors

  • Hannes J. König, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Germany
  • Christine Fürst, Inst. of Sustainable Landscape Development, Martin-Luther University Halle (MLU), Germany
  • Stephanie Kramer-Schadt, Leibniz Institute for Zoo- and Wildlife Research (IZW), Germany
  • Christian Kiffner, The School for Field Studies (SFS), Tanzania
  • Oliver Keuling, Institute for Terrestrial and Aquatic Wildlife Research (ITAW), Germany
  • Adam T. Ford, –Department of Biology, The University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada